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Flying V Farmers  |  Flying V Farm  |  Placerville, CA

Subject: Seeking Garden Symphylan Guidance

Hi all,

My name is Grayson, myself and three others started a diversified fruit and veggie farm in Placerville CA this January.

We are learning that we have a Garden Symphylan (GS) infestation in parts of our veggie field. I have found them on the roots of crop plants, as well as lured them with potato slices. They have seriously damaged patches of direct sown spinach, killing or stunting plants just after germination, seems to be stunting growth on transplanted parsley and currently are attacking our direct seeded squash as it germs, killing some before they break the soil surface. It is presenting in patches, and is especially hindering direct sown crops. I have found them in numbers up to five per plant in the bad spots, and 15+ on some of the potato lures. It's definitely impacting our yields and causing us to worry about the suitability of the site.

After reading though some literature on GS it

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In Topics Soil Fertility Management, Seed & Planting, Pest & Disease Management, Beginning Farmers & Ranchers

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Comments 16
06/02/18, updated

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  |  Floodgate Farm  |  Redwood Valley, CA commented

I was told tilling and keeping organic matter low would help. Fortunately I ignored that advice. My OM went from 5% when I had a limited infestation 3 years ago to 8 or 9% now. They seemed to have come in on some goat manure. I do little soil disturbance, just to get plants in. Symphylans now do negligible damage so the fact they eat fungal hyphae which are probably more abundant now seems the case here. I'd suggest no till and transplanting into cut-down areas (cut don't dig in cover crops) or if planting into the just-harvested crop, cut those plantsyou are done with just below surface)

07/16/18 10:29 PM

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Katie Brimm  |  Multinational Exchange for Sustainable Agriculture  |  Oakland, CA

Subject: Earn a Certificate in Applied Agroecology with MESA's online course

Greetings all,

Our Spring Cohort for the Applied Agroecology Program is open for enrollement - sign up today for the May 1st start date. We invite you to learn more about this opporuntity below. Please share widely with your networks that might be interested! This is also a great opportunity to offer your farm workers/interns/apprentices as well to supercharge their learning experiences.
Best,
Katie and the MESA Team

MESA'S Certificate in Applied Agroecology Program:

Farm Locally, Connect Globally.

The Multinational Exchange for Sustainable Agricultural (MESA) is proud to offer the Certificate in Applied Agroecology Program (CAAP), completely online! Our Certificate in Applied Agroecology is open-sourced, community based, with contributions from experts in the field, and builds both your technical knowledge and your theoretical framework of the socio-political aspects of farming.

Drawing

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In Topics Soil Fertility Management, Seed & Planting, Pest & Disease Management, Certifications, Beginning Farmers & Ranchers, Women in Agriculture, Weather & Climate Change, News & Events

In General FarmsReach community, North Coast Farmers Guild: Sebastopol, CA Women, Food and Agriculture Network

Comment 0
04/17/18
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Torrey Douglass  |  Weather Watch Ranch  |  Boonville, CA

Subject: It's almost fly time! Spring is ramping up and the first flies are appearing. We have chickens, pig

It's almost fly time! Spring is ramping up and the first flies are appearing. We have chickens, pigs, and cows. Anyone have some effective and non-toxic/low-toxic solutions for fly abatement? Thanks for any tips!

In Topics Pest & Disease Management

Comments 8
05/30/13, updated

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  |  Rincon-Vitova Insectaries  |  Ventura, CA commented

We at Rincon-Vitova Insectaries grow 3 species of fly parasite wasps for a mixture that works in most situations. In addition we sell the Sagebrush traps made by David Olkowski from small hanging traps to ones that sit on a 5 gallon bucket and one that sits on a 55 gallon drum. Molasses diluted 1:3 with water makes a great fly bait that smells pleasant for about 2 weeks then begins to stink. We also carry balEnce fly spray that is NOP organic, so we can offer a complete organic/biological fly control program. balEnce contains a strain of Beauvaria bassicana, an insect eating fungus, that kills flies but does not harm fly parasites. For biting flies we produce the NZI trap that is a visual target for tabanid flies like horse and deer flies that irritate cattle and humans. We set up scheduled shipments so farmers can stay on top of fly problems so they can keep flies suppressed, a comfortable place to be.

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04/11/18 11:04 PM

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Team Bernier  |  Bernier Farms  |  Geyserville, CA

Subject: Rats on the farm

Hello fellow farmers,

How is everyone doing with their rodent population. It seems that we have more rats than usual and I have been setting traps with peanut butter, but my rats don't seem to go for it. We have tried the electronic or battery operated traps and those don't seem effective either. Any suggestions out there? Yael Bernier/Bernier Farms

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Comments 9
03/07/18

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  |  Mendocino County Resource Conservation District  |  Boonville, CA commented

Hi Yael,

you can’t use good organic peanut butter, they don’t go for that. Try Jiffy’s or a similar brand ????

03/08/18 8:07 AM

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Shubham Jaiswal  |  Mordor Intelligence  |  Boston, MA

Subject: Discussion on Biostimulants market in Florida

Hi,

I would like your inputs on the following queries:

1. Do you use biostimulants? If yes, then what products do you use?

2. Would you like to use biostimulants? If yes, then what kind of biostimulants would you prefer?
3. Do you think Biostimulants are healthy for soil ?
4. If you are considering to use biostimulants then, what details do you need before starting to use the product?.
5. What are the major issues that arise during growing strawberry, tomato and other crops?

In Topics Soil Fertility Management, Pest & Disease Management

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Comment 1
03/02/18
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  |  FarmsReach  |  Berkeley, CA commented

We saw your post requesting info from the farming market in Florida... 1) 99% of this community is in California, and 2) I see that you are a market research firm, which is not a good fit for this forum. May we suggest you contact farmers and ranchers in Florida directly. Best of luck.

03/02/18 11:41 AM

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Paul Underhill  |  Terra Firma Farm  |  Winters, CA

Subject: UCCE Bagrada Study

I thought it best to post this in a new thread. This study shows the extreme difficulty of controlling bagrada bugs organically as well as the potential risk it poses to anyone who is growing brassicas.

http://ucanr.edu/blogs/blogcore/postdetail.cfm?postnum=15855

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Comments 12
11/11/14

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  |  Classic Organic Farm  |  Gaviota, CA commented

When the mustard on the adjacent hillsides drys up, the Bagrada moves into my fields - August or September usually. When the weather cools down in November, they are a lot less active. They try to hide in cracks and crevices in the barns and houses.

11/15/14 6:11 AM

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Ben Lyons  |  Lockewood Acres  |  Vacaville, CA

Subject: Cucumber Beetles

I have a beautiful patch of pumpkins and i am noticing lots! of cucumber beetles. Should i be concerned about damage to the blossoms that would result in less fruit. If so what is out there that an organic farmer can use. I have not had to use anything to date and have noticed scaring on fruit but that was not an issue last year. thanks

ben

In Topics Pest & Disease Management

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Comment 0
08/29/17
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Paul Underhill  |  Terra Firma Farm  |  Winters, CA

Subject: Solarization

I'm wondering if anyone out there has tried or is successfully doing soil solarization for weed control?

I did a few small fields this year and am hoping to compare notes on challenges and strategies. As usual, the resources available from UC extension are very academic in their focus and offer very little practical information and zero problemsolving details.

Thanks!

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Comments 12
08/01/17

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  |  Root 64  |  SACRAMENTO, CA commented

I got used plastic so can't tell you the exact specs since I didn't buy it new. My understanding is that it was made specifically for solarizing, and the farmer I got it from (UCD student farm) got it second hand from a wildlands reclamation program where it was used to control invasive weeds / clear house before planting natives. It is substantially thinner than greenhouse plastic, but sinilarly UV stabilized. Because it was used and had a few holes, we doubled it over, and after soaking the area, covered up the THICK stand of Bermuda for 2-3 months of summer heat. Once or twice, I threaded a hose into the patch under the plastic and soaked it again. When I pulled it back in October or so it was truly a miracle! A thick mat of dead Bermuda mulch and not a rhizome to be found.

A couple of things of note: we have EXTREMELY heavy clay soil, which I've heard keeps Bermuda rhizomes quite shallow, helping

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08/05/17 9:55 PM

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Brandon Sanders  |  RobinSong Farms  |  Templeton, CA

Subject: SLCV in C. moschata

I have, I believe, a form of Squash Leaf Curl Virus (upward curl) in a distinct area of my winter squash field. It seems to only be infecting C. moschata varieties, particularly Kikuza. At first, online research made it seem that I am not in a region where the virus exists, but I started to see more talk of it in CA. I am wondering:

1) How should I be preventing this in the future?

2) Should I be removing the infected plants? I do not see any whitefly currently.

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Comments 3
06/13/17

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  |  Terra Firma Farm  |  Winters, CA commented

If you have a virus on your cucurbits it is either transmitted by flying and sucking insects (you mentioned whitefly but leafhoppers and aphids would be just as likely culprits) or it came in with the seed. If it's just on one variety right now, the latter is more likely.

Either way it's too late for you to do anything for the infected plants. Actinovate is not effective against viruses, nor is any other certified organic material.

The worst case scenario is that the virus is seed-borne and gets passed from the infected variety to the rest of your field via insects. The safe strategy would be to destroy the infected variety, especially if it's not a big part of your planting.

You should also let the seed company that supplied the seed know about the virus, although they will likely deny that it came from them. But if they get reports from other farmers who grew it, they will have

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06/14/17 7:47 AM

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Jacob Roberson  |  Community Alliance with Family Farmers (CAFF)  |  Fresno, CA

Subject: Food Safety Regional Lead for Tulare, Fresno, Madera, and Merced counties

Good Morning Ya'll,

My name is Jacob Roberson and I am the Food Safety Regional Lead for Tulare, Fresno, Madera, and Merced counties for a non-profit organization called Community Alliance with Family Farmers (new to Fresno area). CAFF is well established all over California except for the Central Valley which is where I am based out of (Fresno to be exact). I wanted to use this post as a source to contact farmers who are struggling with food safety and cannot afford to hire an outside consultant to come to their farm, perform assessments, help with documentation, and get their farm ready for a 3rd party audit. I perform the same duties as an outside consultant but my service is no cost to the farmer. CAFF is a non-profit organization looking to better food safety standards and procedures practiced on small farms / farms at a disadvantage (financial hardships, language barriers, new farmers, etc.).

Food

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In Topics Soil Fertility Management, Pest & Disease Management, Water & Irrigation, Harvesting, Washing, Packing & Packaging, Waste Management, Food Safety, Trucks, Delivery & Logistics, Certifications, Wildlife Management, Beginning Farmers & Ranchers, Anything Goes

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Comment 0
06/09/17
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