Nutrient Management Solutions


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Subject: Nutrient Mgmt Virtual Field Day: Monitoring nutrient and moisture levels to maximize productivity

Welcome to the Nutrient Management Virtual Field Day! Here is our first topic to kick things off:

Clearly, in limited water situations, monitoring your nutrient and moisture helps maximize productivity. What are your top tips for farms to accomplish this? What monitoring practices do you use? How did you adapt your monitoring practices for the drought?

Below, our featured panelists will respond, and then we invite YOU to share any ideas, tips or questions you have as well.

For bios of our panelists and to learn more about the Series, check out the Nutrient Management Solutions group. This Nutrient Management Series in Times of Drought Series is a collaboration of UC SAREP, FarmsReach and Sustainable Conservation.

In Topics Soil Fertility Management, Water & Irrigation

In General FarmsReach community, Nutrient Management Solutions

Comments 7
11/17/14, updated

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  |  Customized Water Systems  |  Modesto, CA commented

Hello Franz thanks for quick http://feedback.We are tracking infiltration depths with GPS moisture probes wirelessly connected to the matched Software package to track improvements. Using either the frequency drivenC2A0 Hydrosmart water systems or the ESP frequency driven water systemsWater Infiltration root zone depth is faster and deeper. On almonds we are seeing approx. 18" deeper penetration infiltration. We will be in Phoenix at the Irrigation show this week. If you are wondering where to get more info go to http://www.hydrosmart.com.auC2A0 Or http://www.customizedwatersystems.comWe own USA distribution support on these non flow restricted water systems. The systems creates scalar energy wetter water with hydrogen bonds broken. Wetter water soaks in the ground faster and breaks up scale into usable root nutrients in high TDS water. Units are all Green http://performance.We are dropping 3 more ESP... Read More
11/25/14 10:31 PM

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Subject: Manure water/commercial fertilizer on silage corn

Next question in the series: What practices are you utilizing to ensure you are getting the most value from your manure water and any commercial fertilizer used on silage corn?

Note: All posts in the Soil Nutrient Management Series re: Forage Crops are posted in the Nutrient Management Solutions Group. To not miss a post and join the group, it takes one click here.

For more context and references, see our Soil Nutrient Management Toolkit and the recent blog about this Series. For bios of our panelists, check out the Nutrient Management Solutions group. This Nutrient Management Series in Times of Drought Series is a collaboration of UC SAREP, FarmsReach and Sustainable Conservation.

In Topics Soil Fertility Management, Seed & Planting, Water & Irrigation

In Nutrient Management Solutions

Comments 2
04/16/15

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  |  Tirupati Fresh Agro Crop Science  |  Indore, AL commented

That fertilizers stay clear of the application of chemicals which often not only leave the vegetables and fruit tasting far better, but help the planet. Many people prefer healthy living along with looking to stop on ingredients that have chemicals. Husch & Husch Firm's ferlizers are not dealt with chemically. His or her fertilizers may verify for ones yard when they assistance in improving your libido in the garden soil. His or her products will not include creature excrement and so are welcoming within distributing when they include reduced odour.

Natural fertilizer and Soil fertilizer test will not discharge vitamins and minerals since easily since a few man made fertilizers, which often stops over-fertilization associated with vegetation, bouquets or even produce. Natural fertilizers usually tend to separate vitamins and minerals far more slowly, featuring vegetation a comfortable circulation associated with pure vitamins and minerals that boost their own growth.

07/23/15 3:07 AM

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Subject: Nutrient Management in Times of Drought: Summary Links & Series Feedback!

A big Thank You to the knowledgeable experts and panelists who participated in the Nutrient Management Series over the past five months!

Please take our two-minute survey to let us know what was helpful or not; and what information *you* would like to see in the future to better manage soil nutrients and the reduced water supply.

A lot of great wisdom was shared during the series, and so below are some quick links to access the highlights. This was a challenging yet fun pilot to bring the complex topic of soil management to a broader audience online, so of course there is more we can cover. Please take our quick survey to share your thoughts.

If you haven’t heard of the three-part series until now, check out the project background and vision. And join the Group for future series!

Tree Crops & Almonds

... Read More

In Topics Soil Fertility Management, Seed & Planting, Trees, Vines & Planting, Water & Irrigation, Livestock, Weather & Climate Change

In General FarmsReach community, Nutrient Management Solutions

Comment 0
05/19/15, updated

Subject: Common mistakes with drip irrigation

Last question in the series: What are the top mistakes you have made or others you've seen make with drip irrigation?

Note: All posts in the Soil Nutrient Management Series re: Forage Crops are posted in the Nutrient Management Solutions Group. To not miss a post and join the group, it takes one click here.

For more context and references, see our Soil Nutrient Management Toolkit and the recent blog about this Series. For bios of our panelists, check out the Nutrient Management Solutions group. This Nutrient Management Series in Times of Drought Series is a collaboration of UC SAREP, FarmsReach and Sustainable Conservation.

In Topics Soil Fertility Management, Seed & Planting, Water & Irrigation

In Nutrient Management Solutions

Comments 2
04/17/15

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  |  UCCE  |  Woodland, CA commented

With subsurface drip, it’s a mistake to not consider gopher control. It might not be a good idea to install drip in an area with a gopher control problem. Choose an area where you don’t have a huge gopher pressures, if possible. Flood irrigation can help control gophers. I would recommend to put in checks along with the subsurface drip system, just in case you need to flood to control the gophers. Drip systems have an upfront cost that can take you three years to pay off, so you want to make sure your drip system doesn’t get destroyed!

04/17/15 5:52 PM

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Subject: Forage crop planting schedules

Next question in the series: What is your planting schedule for the forage? How has the drought impacted your ability to get forage crop seed planted on schedule?

Note: All posts in the Soil Nutrient Management Series re: Forage Crops are posted in the Nutrient Management Solutions Group. To not miss a post and join the group, it takes one click here.

For more context and references, see our Soil Nutrient Management Toolkit and the recent blog about this Series. For bios of our panelists, check out the Nutrient Management Solutions group. This Nutrient Management Series in Times of Drought Series is a collaboration of UC SAREP, FarmsReach and Sustainable Conservation.

In Topics Soil Fertility Management, Seed & Planting, Water & Irrigation, Livestock

In Nutrient Management Solutions

Comment 1
04/15/15
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  |  Mendocino Organics  |  Redwood Valley, CA commented

We just started seeding the rangeland this year. We can’t use no-till drill because of terrain so we broadcast the seed. We bought perennial sub-clover and grass seed, broadcasting ahead of animals, which we hope will help bury the seed and fertilize with manure. Subclovers don’t germinate well in the first year. We’ve seen some stuff come up, but it may be a couple of years until we see the benefits. The stuff coming up now we will let go to seed and keep the animals from grazing it. Next year winter/spring we’ll bring back the animals again.
With the drought issue, we have to move our animals more often. We usually get 50 plus inches of rain here and this year we’ve got 20. We’re debating if we want to cut hay at one of the properties we graze. But we have a unique situation with grazing land of more than 2000 acres, and we only have 20 cows and 100 sheep, plus a lot of residual stockpiled forage.

04/15/15 2:49 PM

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Subject: Application of manure...

Next question in the series: With the drought conditions, how has the application of your manure water changed?

Note: All posts in the Soil Nutrient Management Series re: Forage Crops are posted in the Nutrient Management Solutions Group. To not miss a post and join the group, it takes one click here.

For more context and references, see our Soil Nutrient Management Toolkit and the recent blog about this Series. For bios of our panelists, check out the Nutrient Management Solutions group. This Nutrient Management Series in Times of Drought Series is a collaboration of UC SAREP, FarmsReach and Sustainable Conservation.

In Topics Soil Fertility Management, Water & Irrigation

In Nutrient Management Solutions

Comments 2
04/13/15

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  |  Medeiros and Son Dairy  |  Hanford, CA commented

We'll run light irrigation with manure water and lightly till into the top soil. Our belief is that it will help retain organic matter in the top soil as well as hold onto soil moisture. With no other irrigation water being applied the remainder of the year, we are not worried about leaching any nutrients as there is no water to take those nutrients past the root zone. We have taken some time to prove this idea on a test plot with soil samples, to ensure our idea is in fact valid, but our goal is to be 100% certain before exercising this idea across the entire fallowed ground.

04/14/15 10:05 AM

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Subject: Innovative practices and technologies for forage crops

Next question in the series: What innovative practices or new technologies are you all using to manage your forage crops?

Note: All posts in the Soil Nutrient Management Series re: Forage Crops will only be shared in the Nutrient Management Solutions Group. To join the group, it takes one click here.

For more context and references, see our Soil Nutrient Management Toolkit and the recent blog about this Series. For bios of our panelists, check out the Nutrient Management Solutions group. This Nutrient Management Series in Times of Drought Series is a collaboration of UC SAREP, FarmsReach and Sustainable Conservation.

In Topics Soil Fertility Management, Water & Irrigation, Equipment, Livestock

In Nutrient Management Solutions

Comments 4
04/10/15

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  |  Dellavalle Lab  |  Fresno, CA commented

There is a tool for irrigation scheduling from the Center for Irrigation technology, called Water Right: http://www.wateright.org. It’s a calculator, which is CA specific, although it only considers uniform soil type. It's a decent guide for alfalfa and annual crops, although not great for trees and vines.


Some growers are using drones to collect plant stress and soil quality data. Drones are a matter of 'you get what you pay for' -- There is a great range out there in terms of quality. Satellite image data can often work just as well. Precision ag tools can be wonderful if you have a crop that can support the technology economically. There has to be an economic incentive and large enough acreage to make integration worthwhile. Also, the use of in-field sensors is steadily gaining utility and adoption. Canopy temperature sensors are getting more and more interesting in terms of crop health and pest

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04/13/15 5:09 PM

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Subject: Forage crops to plant during drought conditions

Next question in the series: How are the drought conditions changing the crops forage growers are deciding to plant?

Note: Starting today, all posts in the Soil Nutrient Management Series re: Forage Crops will only be shared in the Nutrient Management Solutions Group. To join the group, it takes one click here.

For more context and references, see our Soil Nutrient Management Toolkit and the recent blog about this Series. For bios of our panelists, check out the Nutrient Management Solutions group. This Nutrient Management Series in Times of Drought Series is a collaboration of UC SAREP, FarmsReach and Sustainable Conservation.

In Topics Soil Fertility Management, Seed & Planting, Water & Irrigation, Livestock

In Nutrient Management Solutions

Comments 4
04/09/15

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  |  UCCE  |  Woodland, CA commented

Speaking of alfalfa... With alfalfa needing about 4 acre feet of water for full production, the question becomes: If you’re relying entirely on surface water how are you going to manage the water you have available? Should you divide it up and give your alfalfa a tiny drink at every cutting? Or is it better to get more water on earlier in the season? I’ve seen some research that suggests that midseason cutoffs are likely to maximize yields, meaning that full irrigations for portions of the early season could be better than partial irrigations over the whole season.


·Also, one of the biggest issues in alfalfa is the stem nematode, a microscopic worm that has been expanding in its range. It feeds on the above ground parts of the crown, and creates entry wounds for secondary pathogens. It disappears after the first cutting but the first is the most productive. Growers should be careful to wash equipment well when moving from one field to the next.

04/12/15 10:18 PM

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Subject: UC cost of production study for alfalfa on subsurface drip irrigation, including pics

I want to share a new study we just finished looking at the cost of production for alfalfa on subsurface drip irrigation. The study provides information on the costs for establishing and producing alfalfa for six years using this system. Take a look here. Let me know if you have any questions about the study.

Additionally, I want to share two photos (number 2&3 below) of the same alfalfa field in Yolo County, which went dry last summer due to no water allocation, but the stand recovered once it started raining again in the fall. Alfalfa is highly drought tolerant because the plants will go dormant without water, but then of course there's no yield.
Photo #1: Drip irrigation pumps

Photo #2: Dry alfalfa field in Yolo County

Photo #3: Recovered alfalfa field in Yolo County

In Topics Soil Fertility Management, Seed & Planting, Water & Irrigation, Livestock

In General FarmsReach community, Nutrient Management Solutions

Comments 4
04/07/15, updated

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  |  UCCE  |  Woodland, CA commented

We’d be interested in hearing from others, but thought we’d add to the discussion of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) in alfalfa. The UC ANR 2014 cost study for SDI in alfalfa is an economic analysis, not a feasibility study. Many of the growers who are implementing SDI in alfalfa are in the San Joaquin Valley or Imperial Valley, as well as the Sacramento Valley. The only region where SDI seems more problematic is the Intermountain region where rodents are a bigger issue, and the potential yield gains are less due to the short season.

SDI makes available essentially an infinite number of possibilities for irrigation scheduling, compared with check-flood in alfalfa (or in furrow systems for row crops). It minimizes evaporation. Check flood is limited to 1 or 2 irrigations (of about 4-6” each) per harvest period in most cases. Farmers have used a wide range of irrigation schedules with SDI in

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04/09/15 12:01 PM

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Subject: Nutrient Mgmt Virtual Field Day: Monitoring moisture and nutrients in forage fields

What are some specific ways to monitor moisture and nutrients in forage crop fields?

In Topics Soil Fertility Management, Seed & Planting, Water & Irrigation, Livestock

In General FarmsReach community, Nutrient Management Solutions

Comments 4
04/07/15

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  |  FarmsReach  |  Berkeley, CA commented

Thanks, John! For those who missed it last year, here’s a link to an article we wrote about John’s farm during our Water & Drought blog series: http://blog.farmsreach.com/water-series-pt-8-drought-effects-tips-from-central-valleys-lonewillow-ranch/

And, here’s a direct link to his video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FDQpji4hyW8

04/07/15 4:36 PM

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